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Added more documentation for the config console

Now there's a docs/ directory for storing our documentation in!
Clara Hobbs 5 years ago
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      README.md
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      docs/console_config.md

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README.md View File

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 When `write` is run, the chosen settings are written to flash.  You can then
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 simply disconnect the Sink from your computer.
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+For more information about the serial console configuration interface, see
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+`docs/console_config.md`.
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+
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 [GNU Screen]: https://www.gnu.org/software/screen/
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 [Minicom]: https://alioth.debian.org/projects/minicom
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 [PuTTY]: http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/

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+# PD Buddy Sink Serial Console Configuration Interface
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+
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+The PD Buddy Sink can be put into setup mode by holding the Setup button while
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+plugging it into a computer.  In this mode, the device does not perform any USB
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+Power Delivery communications, instead running a configuration console over a
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+USB CDC-ACM virtual serial port.  This allows the user to change the voltage
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+and current the Sink requests, as well as other settings related to the
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+device's operation.
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+
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+## Quick Start
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+
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+### Connecting to the Configuration Console
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+
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+Connect to the PD Buddy Sink with your favorite serial console program, such as
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+[GNU Screen][], [Minicom][], or [PuTTY][].  On Linux, the device file will
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+probably be something like `/dev/ttyACM0`.  Any baud rate will work, as USB
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+CDC-ACM doesn't care what it's set to.  After connecting, press Enter and you
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+should be greeted with a `PDBS)` prompt.
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+
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+[GNU Screen]: https://www.gnu.org/software/screen/
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+[Minicom]: https://alioth.debian.org/projects/minicom
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+[PuTTY]: http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/
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+
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+### View the Saved Configuration
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+
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+To see the configuration the device already has, run `get_cfg`:
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+
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+    PDBS) get_cfg
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+    status: valid
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+    flags: (none)
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+    v: 9.00 V
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+    i: 3.00 A
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+
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+If the Sink has no configuration, this will simply print `No configuration`.
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+
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+### Setting Voltage and Current
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+
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+The `set_v` and `set_i` commands allow you to set the voltage and current the
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+Sink will request.  The units used are millivolts and milliamperes.  For
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+example, to configure the device to request 2.25 A at 20 V, run the following
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+commands:
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+
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+    PDBS) set_v 20000
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+    PDBS) set_i 2250
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+
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+### Reviewing Configuration Changes
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+
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+The changes made so far are held temporarily in RAM.  To review the temporary
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+configuration buffer, run `get_tmpcfg`:
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+
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+    PDBS) get_tmpcfg
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+    status: valid
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+    flags: (none)
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+    v: 20.00 V
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+    i: 2.25 A
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+
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+### Saving Configuration
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+
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+The configuration buffer must be written to flash for the device to actually
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+request the selected voltage and current.  To do this, run:
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+
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+    PDBS) write
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+
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+As soon as the prompt reappears after running `write`, the changes have been
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+stored to flash, which can be verified with `get_cfg`.  The Sink may be safely
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+unplugged at any time.
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+
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+## Commands
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+
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+### help
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+
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+Usage: `help`
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+
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+Prints short help messages about all available commands.
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+
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+### license
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+
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+Usage: `license`
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+
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+Prints licensing information for the firmware.
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+
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+### erase
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+
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+Usage: `erase`
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+
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+Erases all stored configuration from flash.  This can be used to restore a
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+device to its default state.
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+
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+Note: The `erase` command is mainly intended for development and testing.
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+Stored configuration is automatically erased if necessary when `write` is run,
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+and wear leveling is performed as well.  Unless you really know what you're
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+doing, there should be no reason to ever run `erase`.
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+
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+### write
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+
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+Usage: `write`
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+
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+Writes the contents of the configuration buffer to flash.  Wear leveling is
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+done to ensure long flash life, and the flash sector is automatically erased if
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+necessary.
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+
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+### load
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+
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+Usage: `load`
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+
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+Loads the current configuration from flash into the buffer.  Useful if you want
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+to change some settings while leaving others alone.
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+
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+### get_cfg
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+
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+Usage: `get_cfg [index]`
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+
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+If no index is provided, prints the current configuration from flash.  If there
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+is no configuration, `No configuration` is printed instead.
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+
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+For developers, if an index is provided, prints a particular location in the
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+configuration flash sector.
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+
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+### get_tmpcfg
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+
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+Usage: `get_tmpcfg`
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+
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+Prints the contents of the configuration buffer.
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+
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+### toggle_giveback
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+
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+Usage: `toggle_giveback`
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+
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+Toggles the GiveBack flag in the configuration buffer.  GiveBack allows the
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+power supply to temporarily remove power from the Sink's output if another
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+device needs more power.  Recommended if the Sink is being used to charge a
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+battery.
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+
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+### set_v
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+
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+Usage: `set_v voltage_in_mV`
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+
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+Sets the voltage of the configuration buffer, in millivolts.
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+
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+### set_i
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+
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+Usage: `set_i current_in_mA`
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+
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+Sets the current of the configuration buffer, in milliamperes.
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+
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+### identify
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+
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+Usage: `identify`
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+
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+Blinks the LED quickly.  Useful for identifying which device you're connected
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+to if several are plugged in to your computer at once.

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